144 Piece Mintmark & Variety Set, Circulation Strikes (1892-1954) -- Maine - York

The 144-piece silver commemorative set includes all of the 50 different type coin commemoratives issued from 1892 through 1954, plus each date and mintmark of the multiple issues. For instance, there was only one York commemorative issued, but there were three Cincinnati commemoratives (1936-P, 1936-D, and 1936-S) and 13 different Texas commemoratives. 


This popular series is filled with low-mintage coins, including the lowest mintage silver coins of the 20th century. Most commemoratives are mint state, as they are what is called NCLT, or non-circulating legal tender. Key issues of the series are the Hawaiian, Hudson, and Spanish Trail (low mintage type coins) and the Sesqui and Monroe (condition rarities), plus the Lafayette dollar among many others.

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Alabama - Lynchburg

1920 50C Maine MS67+

1920 50C Maine MS67+

The 1920 Maine was minted to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Maine's statehood. The mintage of this issue was a relatively high 50,028 pieces and many were saved. The original issue price was $1.00. Today, the Maine is one of the more available "early", i.e. pre-1930, silver commemorative issues. It is only a little bit rarer than the 1936 Robinson and 1935 Connecticut.

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1934 50C Maryland MS67+

1934 50C Maryland MS67+

Today, Marylands are moderately scarce. Most specimens are mint state and the most frequently encountered grades are MS63 to MS66. Superb MS67 examples are rare. Marylands are comparable in rarity to the Lynchburg, Gettysburg, Albany, New Rochelle, and Antietam. Marylands are rarer than the Elgin, Roanoke, Norfolk, Wisconsin, and York, but not as rare as the Robinson or Connecticut.

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1921 50C Missouri MS66+

1921 50C Missouri MS66+

 The 1921 Missouri was struck to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Missouri statehood. A very large mintage was authorized but many were melted as unsold. There is some comtroversy as to the actual "distributed" mintage and even experts disagree. To add to the confusion, there are two varieties of the Missouri and the exact mintage breakdown between the two is speculative. The two varieities are one with a 2 and a 4 struck into the obverse field with a star between the 2 and the 4. In numismatic circles, this variety is known as the "Missouri 2 by 4". The other variety does not have the 2*4 in the field and is known as the "Missouri plain". The 2 and 4 were meant to signify that Missouri was the 24th state admitted to the Union and the idea was to have the 2 by 4s sell for a premium to defray the cost of production. But as it turned out, both varieties were sold at an original price of $1.00. The distributed mintage for the plain Missuri has been reported as between 10,428 and 15,428 coins. The Missouri 2*4 mintage has long been listed at 5,000 coins. However, there is a problem with the 5,000 figure for the Missouri 2*4 in that it is just barely rarer than the the Plain Missouri. My personal feeling is that the 15,428 figure is too high and the 5,000 is too low.

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1921 50C Missouri 2X4 MS66

1921 50C Missouri 2X4 MS66

The Missouri 2X4 is one of the key issues in the silver commemorative series. (See my narrative for the "plain" Missouri...coin #9330...for the story of the Missouri issue and the controversy over their mintage figures.) Missouri 2X4s range in grade from AU to MS65 on average. The MS65s are rare and Superb Gem MS66 examples are very rare. Missouri 2X4s can be frosty or toned. Frosty, original examples are definitely the exception. And the toned Missouris can often be dull and unattractive. The premium specimens are the frosty white or the attractively toned pieces.

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1923-S 50C Monroe MS67+

1923-S 50C Monroe MS67+

The typical Monroe can grade anywhere from AU to MS64. MS65 examples are very scarce and Superb Gem MS66 specimens are definitely rare. The design of the Monroe is very flat. This leads to problems with strike and also attracts numersous handling marks and abraisions. A well struck, mark-free Monroe is definitely a premium rarity for a silver commemorative. Luster can be very frosty and of course toning can be present in varying degrees.

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1938 50C New Rochelle MS68

1938 50C New Rochelle MS68

The New Rochelle was a somewhat contrived issue. It was authorized in 1936, struck in 1937, and had a date of 1938. Whatever the intent of its issue, it is a beautiful design and it is quite popular with collectors today. The original mintage was 25,015 coins and the issue price was a relatively high $2.00. Apparently New Rochelles were subject to above average care in minting and handling as nearly all specimens are very high grade. The average grade is MS64 to MS66. Superb Gem MS67 specimens aren't really rare either. In fact, this issue is scarce in MS63 and for all practical purposes unknown in circulated grades.

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1936 50C Norfolk MS69

1936 50C Norfolk MS69

The interesting thing about Norfolk half dollars is that they are the highest quality commemorative in terms of condition. In fact, the average grade for Norfolks is Gem MS65 to Superb Gem MS67. And MS68s aren't exactly rare either. This is probably due to the fact that the design is so busy. There is so much going on with the design that there isn't a lot of flat field space and consequently Norfolks don't seem to ever have many marks. They also usually have great frosty luster and the strike is always full.

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1926 50C Oregon MS68+

1926 50C Oregon MS68+

The story of the Oregon Trail commemoratives is one of explotation and greed. The coins were struck in large quantities to begin with, i.e. the 1926, 1926-S, and 1928 issues, but after several years of trying to sell all 100,055 1926-S Oregons before the 1928 issue could be released, the dealers involved realized that a lower, obstensibly rarer issue would be easier to sell for a good profit and they convinced the Mint to melt 44,000 of the 50,028 originally minted of the 1928. After that the Oregons had lower mintages and were struck in 1933, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1938, and 1939. In other words, Oregons were struck from 1926 thru 1939. No other silver commemorative issue had an issue period that long

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1926-S 50C Oregon MS68

1926-S 50C Oregon MS68

Today, collectors recognize that the coins are beautiful and highly collectible regardless of the circumstances of their minting. The 1926-S is the highest mintage Oregon Trail and it is the commonest by overall rarity. But, while not rare in Superb MS66 or better condition, it is not the most readily available Oregon in the loftiest of grades. The typical specimen usually has good frosty white luster. Marks are usually not a problem with any of the Oregon issues. For the 1926-S, virtually exclusively for the Oregons, strike can sometimes be a problem.

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1928 50C Oregon MS68

1928 50C Oregon MS68

The 1928 is the third Oregon Trail issue and was part of the weird situation for the the first three Oregon Trail commemorative issues.There were 47,955 1926 Philadelphia Oregons issued. Then there were 100,055 1926 San Francisco Mint Oregon minted, but they didn't sell as well and some remained undistributed until 1933. In 1928, the Philadelphia Mint struck 50,028 Oregons but declined to release them until the 1926-S Oregons had been sold. In 1933, the 17,000 unsold 1926-S Oregons were melted, allowing the Mint to sell the 1928 Oregons that had been sitting in their vaults for 5 years. Wayte Raymond of Scott Stamp & Coin in New York City agreed to market the 1928 Oregons, but requested that all but 6,000 be melted and the Mint acquiesced.

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1933-D 50C Oregon MS67+

1933-D 50C Oregon MS67+

After the sales and distribution problems with the 1926, 1926-S, and 1928 Oregon Trails, the 1933-D had  a much smaller mintage. The original distributed mintage was 5,008 coins, though at $2.00 they were sold for the double the original issue price of the three earlier issues. 


After the sales and distribution problems with the 1926, 1926-S, and 1928 Oregon Trails, the 1933-D had  a much smaller mintage. The original distributed mintage was 5,008 coins, though at $2.00 they were sold for the double the original issue price of the three earlier issue

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1934-D 50C Oregon MS67+

1934-D 50C Oregon MS67+

The 1934-D Oregon Trail Half Dollar Commemorative is not the lowest mintage coin for the Oregon Trail Commemorative series. However, it is the scarcest coin in high grades of MS67 or higher. There are no MS68's for this date and mint mark, despite there being coins graded as high as MS69 in the Oregon Trail Commemorative series.
 

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1936 50C Oregon MS68

1936 50C Oregon MS68

In 1936, the original sale price was dropped to $1.60, down from the $2.00 that was charged for the 1934-D. Oregons were struck at both the Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints. The Philadelphia was struck in greater quantities, almost exactly twice as many, and it is much more common than the 1936-S. There were 10,006 1936 Philadelphia Oregons struck and sold to collectors.

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1936-S 50C Oregon MS68

1936-S 50C Oregon MS68

The 1936-S is the fourth lowest mintage of the 14 Oregon Trail commemorative half dollars and it is indeed the fourth rarest in total number of survivors, surpassed in rarity only by the three very low mintage 1939 issues. There were 5006 originally minted and the issue price was $1.60 per coin. The 1936-S had good initial collector demand and in the summer of 1936 they were bringing as much as $5.50 in various dealer offerings.

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1937-D 50C Oregon MS69

1937-D 50C Oregon MS69

In 1937, the Oregon Trail commemoratives were only minted in Denver. A total of 12,008 coins were minted. Though this is a relatively small mintage, it seems like the entire mintage was saved and well preserved at that as this is one of the most common of the Oregon Trails in Gem condition. The average survivor grades MS64 to MS67. Most examples have very frosty luster and outstanding eye appeal.

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1938 50C Oregon MS68

1938 50C Oregon MS68

Most surviving 1938 Oregons are Mint State with the average grade being MS64 to MS66. The 1938, though not rare at all, is the most difficult of the three to find in Superb MS66 and MS67 condition. The typical 1938 Oregon is extremely well struck and has very clean, mark-free surfaces. Luster is more satiny than frosty.

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1938-D 50C Oregon MS69

1938-D 50C Oregon MS69

Though the mintage for the 1938-D Oregon was modest (only 6,005 coins), this is a fairly available issue. It is the most common of the three 1938 Oregon issues, especially in Gem and Superb Gem condition. This is a boldly struck and beautiful coin. Luster is more satiny than frosty. The average grade is MS64 to MS66 and circulated examples are virtually  non-existent.After the sales and distribution problems with the 1926, 1926-S, and 1928 Oregon Trails, the 1933-D had  a much smaller mintage. The original distributed mintage was 5,008 coins, though at $2.00 they were sold for the double the original issue price of the three earlier issue

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1938-S 50C Oregon MS68

1938-S 50C Oregon MS68

The 1938-S Oregon is fairly easy to obtain in even the highest grades. Of the three 1938 Oregons, the 1938-D is the most common in Superb Gem condition, followed by the 1938-S and then the 1938, but all three come super nice and are not rare at all in spectacular condition. Nearly the entire mintage was saved at the time of issue so circulated examples are extremely rare. The average grade of this issue is MS63 to MS67. The srike is always bold and marks are hardly ever a problem. The luster is satiny. 

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1939 50C Oregon MS67+

1939 50C Oregon MS67+

The 1939 Oregons were the last of the Oregon series, which ran from 1926 thru 1939, the longest U.S. silver commemorative series. At $7.50 per set, the 1939 Oregons had the highest issue price of any of the Oregons. They also had the lowest mintage, 3004 coins for each of the 1939 and 1939-D and 3005 coins for the 1939-S.

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1939-D 50C Oregon MS68+

1939-D 50C Oregon MS68+

The 1939 Oregons, though very low mintages, are somewhat available in Gem condition. Apparently virtually the entire mintage was saved. The average grade for the 1939-D Oregon is MS64 to MS66, and MS67 examples are not truly rare. Of the three 1939 Oregons, the 1939 is the easiest to locate in grades MS66, MS67 and MS68.

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1939-S 50C Oregon MS68+

1939-S 50C Oregon MS68+

While the 1939 Oregons are the lowest mintage issues in the Oregon series, they were saved at the time of issue and are not that hard to find in Gemmy condition. That said, the 1939-S is the rarest of the 1939 Oregons in MS65 or better condition (by a small margin over the 1939).

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1915-S 50C Panama-Pacific MS68

1915-S 50C Panama-Pacific MS68

The 1915-S Panama-Pacific Half Dollar was authorized by an Act of Congress on June 16, 1915 as a fund-raiser for the International Exhibition held in San Francisco, California celebrating the opening of the Panama-Pacific Canal.  The Act authorized a mintage of 200,000 pieces, but only 60,030 were struck.  In addition to the regular silver pieces just mentioned, a small number of examples in gold, silver, and copper were struck at the Philadelphia Mint before the "S" mintmark was added to the dies.  No record of any Proof strikings exist, but Breen repeats the rumor of the existence of two Satin Finish Proofs, both with mintmarks.  

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1920 50C Pilgrim MS68

1920 50C Pilgrim MS68

The 1920 Pilgrim Half Dollars has a small, incuse D underneath the Pilgrim's elbow.  While this might appear to be a mintmark (for Denver) to the uninitiated, this was put on the coin to indicate the designer, Cyrus Dallin, and the D represents his last name.  All 1920 Pilgrim Half Dollars were struck in Philadelphia, making this the only modern "D"-mint coin NOT struck at Denver!

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1921 50C Pilgrim MS68

1921 50C Pilgrim MS68

The Pilgrim commemorative half dollars were struck for in two years, 1920 and 1921. The final distribution figures for the 1921 were considerably less than the 1920; 152,112 for the 1920, and only 20,053 for the 1921. According to Dave Bowers, the 1921 was the first commemorative "variety" "specifically created to increase sales to collectors." But sales of the 1921 Pilgrims were much smaller than the 1920, perhaps because of the economic recession of 1921, perhaps because a lot of collectors already "had" a Pilgrim.

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1936 50C Rhode Island MS68

1936 50C Rhode Island MS68

The design of the Rhode Island is in relatively low relief and consequently many coins have marks and abrasions. Luster is somewhat frosty though many specimens have a somewhat prooflike appearance. Ultra high quality (MS67) examples are surprisingly rare.

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1936-D 50C Rhode Island MS68

1936-D 50C Rhode Island MS68

Though the mintage of the 1936-D Rhode Island is 25% lower than the 1936 and nearly identical to the 1936-S, the 1936-D is just slightly scarcer than the 1936 and quite a bit more common than the 1936-S. The typical 1936-D Rhode Island has frosty luster, though some specimens have semi-prooflike surfaces. Marks can sometimes be a problem with the Rhode Islands due to their shallow design relief.

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1936-S 50C Rhode Island MS67+

1936-S 50C Rhode Island MS67+

Even though it has nearly the identical mintage as the 1936-D, the 1936-S Rhode Island is the rarest of the three Rhode Islands by a significant margin. None of the three are rare in an absolute sense, but the 1936-S has the fewest number of coins graded by PCGS and is obviously tougher to find in Gem condition than the 1936 or 1936-D.

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1937 50C Roanoke MS68+

1937 50C Roanoke MS68+

Today, the Roanoke is quite popular, probably due to the fact that it was a very "legitimate", historically important issue (commemorating the first settlers in Virginia and the birth of Virginia Dare) and the Roanoke is a beautiful design. In terms of rarity, the Roanoke is one of the more common silver commems in uncirculated grades, especially in Gem condition. It is in the same rarity class as the Elgin, Norfolk, Wisconsin, and York. It is more common than the Albany, Antietam, Gettysburg, and New Rochelle.

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1936 50C Robinson MS68

1936 50C Robinson MS68

The Robinson silver commemorative half dollar is actually one of the 1935 to 1939 Arkansas issues. The obverse states "Arkansas Centennial 1836-1936" as do all Arkansas half dollars, but the obverse designed replaced the dual heads of Ms. Liberty and the Indian chief with the bust of Arkansas Senator Joseph T. Rodinson. This design was merely an attempt by the Arkansas Centennial Commission to expand its commemorative coin offering...and it's profit off of the collectors of the day. That 25,265 Robinsons were distributed at the issue price of $1.85 per coin shows there was certainly some success with this strategy.

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1935-S 50C San Diego MS68

1935-S 50C San Diego MS68

San Diego half dollars were struck at the San Francisco Mint in 1935 and the Denver Mint in 1936. They were struck to commemorate the "California-Pacific International Exposition, held in San Diego in 1935 and 1936. They were sold at the Exposition for $1 per coin. For the 1935-S San Diego there were 70,132 coins distributed. But actually, only about half reached public hands and some 30,000 pieces were retained by a few individuals associated with the Exposition. Seveal hoards were disbursed in the 1970s and 1980s. In the 1990s, approximately 5000 1935-S and 5000 1936-D San Diegos were sold into the market. Bottom line: the San Diego is a "hoard coin". In fact, PCGS has graded more 1935-S San Diegos (over 10,000 pieces) than any other silver commemorative of the 1892 to 1954 classic commemorative era.

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1936-D 50C San Diego MS68

1936-D 50C San Diego MS68

The 1935-S and 1936-D San Diegos were minted in very large quantities (250,000 and 180,000 respectively), but most of the mintage of both issues was melted as unsold. The final distributed number for the 1935-S was 70,132 and for the 1936-D was 30,092. But you can't say that the California-Pacific Exposition didn't give it the old college try. The original issue price for the 1936-D was $1.50, then the Exposition raised the price to $3 in 1937, and then reduced the price to $1 in 1938 and then what remained unsold at that time was returned to the Mint to be melted.

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1926 50C Sesquicentennial MS66

1926 50C Sesquicentennial MS66

The typical Sesqui is MS63 or MS64. Because it was an "early" commemorative issue, i.e. struck before the flood of commemoratives issue during the commemorative collecting mania of the 1930's, Sesquis were not all saved and many reached circulation. Gem MS65s are rare and there are only about a dozen or so known Superb Gem MS66s. I personally have never seen or heard of a Sesqui that grades MS67 or higher. The big problem is scraps and marks, particularly on the face on the obverse. Sesquis come with varying degrees of toning, including a very unattractive yellow. The yellow coins sell for a considerable discount and it seems there is somewhat of a two tier market...decent eye appeal coins and yellow toned coins. Obviously, collectors prefer good eye appeal over ugly yellow toning!

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1935 50C Spanish Trail MS68

1935 50C Spanish Trail MS68

The1935 Old Spanish Trail half dollar was designed by a collector, L.W. Hoffecker (later, 1939-1941, President of the American Numismatic Association) to be sold to collectors at the relatively high price of $2.00 per coin. It was somewhat of a contrived issue (as were quite a few other silver commems in the 1935-1939 era) and Hoffecker was involved in the distribution, and therefore the profit made, of the coins. Nonetheless, the Spanish Trail was quite popular with collectors at the time of issue and indeed for all of the years following to the present. It was a good design and the quality is generally quite high.

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1925 50C Stone Mountain MS68+

1925 50C Stone Mountain MS68+

Today, the Roanoke is quite popular, probably due to the fact that it was a very "legitimate", historically important issue (commemorating the first settlers in Virginia and the birth of Virginia Dare) and the Roanoke is a beautiful design. In terms of rarity, the Roanoke is one of the more common silver commems in uncirculated grades, especially in Gem condition. It is in the same rarity class as the Elgin, Norfolk, Wisconsin, and York. It is more common than the Albany, Antietam, Gettysburg, and New Rochelle.

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1934 50C Texas MS68

1934 50C Texas MS68

The 1934 was the largest mintage in the Texas series with 61,463 coins distributed. And today, the 1934 Texas is the most plentiful of the Texas commemoratives. Interestingly, the 1934 Texas, while relatively common in grades MS64 to MS66, is one of the very rarest Texas issues in Superb Gem MS67 condition. The typical 1934 Texas can have either frosty or satin-like luster. Toning runs the gauntlet of various shades and degrees of eye appeal, both positive and negative.

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1935 50C Texas MS68+

1935 50C Texas MS68+

The 1935 Philadelphia Texas is a relatively common silver commemorative coin in all grades up to and including MS67. It is really only rare in near perfect Gem MS68 condition. The were 9,996 coins originally distributed at the $1.50 issue price, and most of those were saved as this issue is actually all but nonexsistant in grades below MS62. The typical specimen has either frosty or somewhat satiny luster with varying degrees of eye appeal.

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1935-D 50C Texas MS68

1935-D 50C Texas MS68

The three 1935 Texas issues are the most common of the 1934-1938 Texas issues. There were 10,007 1935 Denver Texas half dollars distributed at the $1.50 issue price. They are easily available in all grades up to and including MS67. This issue is often very frosty and has outstanding luster and eye appeal.

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1935-S 50C Texas MS67+

1935-S 50C Texas MS67+

The 1935-S Texas, like the 1935 and 1935-D, had among the highest mintages of the 1934-1938 Texas series, and an equally high survival rate. The 1935-S is equal in rarity to the 1935 and 1935-D in grades thru MS65, but it is about twice as rare in grades MS66 and higher. Most 1935-S Texas commems have frosty luster and good eye appeal. Like the other Texas issues, there are many high quality survivors.

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1936 50C Texas MS68

1936 50C Texas MS68

The 1935 and 1936 Texas commemoratives are all readily available in all grades up to MS67 and the 1936 Philadelphia is no exception. The typical specimen is frosty and has good eye appeal. There were 8911 coins originally distributed at the issue price of $1.50 and obviously most of the coins were saved and well preserved.

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1936-D 50C Texas MS68+

1936-D 50C Texas MS68+

The Texas silver commemoratives are readily available in Gem condition and indeed the 1936-D is the most available of all the 1934-1938 Texas issues in MS65 thru MS68 grades. Only the MS68 grade can be considered rare. Most 1936-D Texas have great eye appeal and most have white frosty luster.

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1936-S 50C Texas MS68+

1936-S 50C Texas MS68+

The 1936-S Texas is very similar to the other 1935 and 1936 issues, i.e. it is relatively common in grades MS64 to MS67. The 1936-S is slightly tougher to find in MS67 than the other five 1935-1936 issues. All six issues have a similar mintage, ranging from 8911 to 10,007. The typical 1936-S has frosty original luster and excellent eye appeal.

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1937 50C Texas MS68+

1937 50C Texas MS68+

The three 1937 Texas commemorative half dollars were distributed in less quantities (6571 for the Philadelphia, 6605 for the Denver, and 6637 for the San Francisco) than the seven 1934-1936 issues (8911 to 10,007 for the 1935 and 1936 issues and 61,463 for the 1934). They are consequently rarer. However, none of the 1934-1937 Texas commems are rare in Gem condition as they were all well-preserved. The 1937 Philadelphia is the rarest of the three 1937 issues in Superb Gem MS66 or better condition. The typical 1937 Philadelphia Texas has frosty white luster and excellent eye appeal.

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1937-D 50C Texas MS68

1937-D 50C Texas MS68

All three of the 1937 silver commemorative issues have similar mintages. But for some reason, the 1937 Denver is more plentiful in Gem MS65 and Superb Gem MS66 or better condition. The typical 1937-D Texas has very attractive frosty luster. Circulated examples are virtually non-existent as almost all of the orignal mintage was saved at the time of issue.

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1937-S 50C Texas MS68

1937-S 50C Texas MS68

The 1937-S Texas, like the 1937 and 1937-D, is somewhat more scarce than the 1934, 1935, and 1936 Texas issues. But these coins were saved and cannot be considered rare, even in Superb Gem condition. Nonetheless, they are beautiful coins that have always been very popular with collectors. Most 1937-S Texas have very frosty original luster.

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1938 50C Texas MS68

1938 50C Texas MS68

The 1938 Texas issues were the last coins in the 1934-1938 Texas commemorative series. They were sold at an original issue price of $2.00 per coin, or $6 for a set of all three. They are the lowest mintages of the Texas series with mintages of 3780 for the Philadelphia Mint issue, 3775 for the Denver Mint issue, and 3814 for the San Francisco Mint issue. All three were saved at the time of issue and are often found in Superb Gem condition. And conversely, circulated examples all but don't exist. For some reason, the Philadelphia Mint issue is somewhat rarer than the Denver or San Francisco Mint issues in Superb Gem MS66 or MS67 condition. Most Philadelphia 1938 Texas examples have either frosty or somewhat satin luster.

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1938-D 50C Texas MS68

1938-D 50C Texas MS68

The 1938-D Texas is the lowest mintage of all the Texas commemoratives. However, the 1938 Philadelphia Mint issue is somewhat rarer in Superb Gem condition. The luster on this issue can be either frosty of semi-satin.

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1938-S 50C Texas MS68

1938-S 50C Texas MS68

The 1938-S is a low mintage issue that, like the 1938-D and 1938-S, is quite a bit rarer than the 1934 to 1937 Texas commemorative issues. But all Texas commems were saved at the time of issue, so this issue can be found in Superb Gem condition fairly easily. Strike can occasionally be a problem with this issue, as often happens with San Francisco Mint issues of all U.S. coins of this era. Luster is usually frosty, but can occassionally be satin-like.

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1925 50C Vancouver MS68

1925 50C Vancouver MS68

Today, the Vancouver is considered one of the more desirable coins in the 1892-1954 classic era series. And indeed, Vancouvers are scarce in Gem condition. There was a hoard of about 500 original mint state coins disbursed in 1982. Interestingly, Vancouvers were struck at the San Francisco Mint, but through some Mint production error, the "S" mint mark was not put on the coins. Though scarce, Vancouvers are found in Gem and SUperb Gem condition. This beautiful coin usually has a brilliant looking, frosty luster.

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1927 50C Vermont MS68+

1927 50C Vermont MS68+

The 1927 Vermont silver half dollar was struck to comemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Bennington. This beautifully executed design featured founder and Green Mountain Boy Ira Allen on the obverse and a Canada lynx on the reverse. Interestingly, there was some talk of striking both silver and gold commemoratives of this issue. Unfortunately, the gold commem idea was dropped. Today, the Vermont is one of the rarer coins in the commemorative series. The Vermont was issued at a price of $1 and most were saved. The Vermont has an excellent early price history, particularly in the 1960 to 1980 time frame when it was one of the more expensive coins in the series, and rightly so, because it truly is one of the rarer issues. Indeed, I know of no significant hoards or large quantities that have ever been available. Most Vermonts have frosty luster and though the relief is very high, strike doesn't seem to ever be a problem.

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1951 50C Washington-Carver MS67

1951 50C Washington-Carver MS67

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1951-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

1951-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

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1951-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

1951-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

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1952 50C Washington-Carver MS67+

1952 50C Washington-Carver MS67+

The 1938-S is a low mintage issue that, like the 1938-D and 1938-S, is quite a bit rarer than the 1934 to 1937 Texas commemorative issues. But all Texas commems were saved at the time of issue, so this issue can be found in Superb Gem condition fairly easily. Strike can occasionally be a problem with this issue, as often happens with San Francisco Mint issues of all U.S. coins of this era. Luster is usually frosty, but can occassionally be satin-like.

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1952-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

1952-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

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1952-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67+

1952-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67+

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1953 50C Washington-Carver MS67

1953 50C Washington-Carver MS67

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1953-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66

1953-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66

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1953-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

1953-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

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1954 50C Washington-Carver MS66

1954 50C Washington-Carver MS66

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1954-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

1954-D 50C Washington-Carver MS66+

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1954-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

1954-S 50C Washington-Carver MS67

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1936 50C Wisconsin MS68+

1936 50C Wisconsin MS68+

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1936 50C York MS68+

1936 50C York MS68+

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Above coin descriptions courtesy of David Hall - Formerly of Professional Coin Grading Service (PCGS)